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Tag Archive: ergonomics

  1. Ergonomics: A Winning Formula For Improved Quality, Safety And Production

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    International Products Corporation (IPC) recently upgraded their manufacturing facility with the installation of a 20-liter liquid filling line that not only provides for a quicker, more efficient manufacturing process but also provides ergonomic benefits for workers. The new station was engineered, manufactured and installed by Inline Filling Systems.

    The new equipment has designated product capabilities and is used to fill 20-liter (5-gallon) sized containers of the company’s lubricants and cleaners.

    Features of the new equipment include:

    • Increased Output
    • Increased Fill Accuracy
    • Increased Worker Safety
      • Assisted lift devices
      • Automatic speed adjustments
      • Automatic case erector

    Ergonomic Improvements Are A Win-Win

    Ergonomics Reduces Injuries

    Worker injuries are frequently the result of repetitive movements and strain caused by moving heavy objects. Lifting, pushing and pulling heavy loads can all cause undue strain leading to injury. Ergonomic lifting equipment helps to eliminate the strain caused in these instances. The assisted lift device on IPC’s new fill line bears almost the entire weight of the heavy bottles.

    Ergonomics Improves Quality

    If line workers are in pain, tired or frustrated, the quality of their work may suffer. By installing ergonomic lifting equipment, the strain and repetitive motion of lifting are removed and workers can more easily focus on the task at hand. In addition to providing ergonomic benefits, IPC’s new filling line provides increased automation which reduces the likelihood of human error.

    Ergonomics Increases Productivity

    With ergonomic improvements in place, jobs can be completed with less strain and fewer motions leading to a quicker, more efficient production process. Adding to the ergonomic benefits, IPC’s new filling equipment has the capacity to fill three to four times the number of bottles as the equipment previously used.

    Ergonomic improvements in the workplace are beneficial to companies and their employees. Improvements in quality, production and employee well being all contribute to reduced costs and a safer work environment. A win-win for everyone!

     

  2. How Engineers Choose Rubber Lubricants

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    A Multi-Disciplinary Engineering Approach to Selecting Assembly Lubricants

    Rubber is everywhere! Have you ever stopped to consider how many rubber parts are in your car? Or your dishwasher? Or the airplane flying you away to your dream vacation? So many items that we use every day are composed of thousands of rubber parts of varying size and shape. Each of these components plays an integral role in how that item functions and performs down the road.

    Rubber is truly a unique material. It is elastic yet strong, smooth yet tacky, lightweight yet insulates and protects, and soft yet abrasion-resistant. Rubber stretches and compresses, waterproofs no matter its thickness, and remains flexible over a wide temperature range. What’s more amazing is that any of these properties can be optimized by compounding rubber articles using select elastomers, fillers, processing aids, activators and vulcanizing agents. Rubber’s versatility is only limited by one’s imagination. It’s no wonder rubber is so valuable in many industries for an unlimited number of applications including vibration and sound dampening, sealing, electrical and thermal insulation, chemical transport and waterproofing.

    Rubber is quite versatile. It can be pushed, pulled, stretched, compressed, or heated to fit in, on, or over anything. Rubber is inherently tacky and can be squeezed into tight areas, but it is naturally slip resistant making it difficult to install, remove or manipulate. It’s not unusual for rubber parts to slip during assembly and not go exactly where they’re intended: an O-ring may get twisted, a heater hose may not be fully inserted, a gap can appear in a waterproof seam. Successful assembly can be tricky. Improper assembly can lead to a multitude of problems including destroyed parts, warranty claims, recalls and worker fatigue or injury.

    So, why has rubber installation always seemed to be an afterthought?
    Coating rubber parts with a liquid to provide lubrication prior to assembly helps avoid some of the aforementioned problems. Traditionally, lubricant choice was based on convenience. Line workers would find whatever substances were in the plant and use them for rubber assembly. Some common choices were soap and water, alcohol, gasoline, motor oil, petroleum jelly and silicone spray. While these products do provide lubrication, they also introduce health and safety risks and may damage rubber parts.

    Enter the Engineers…
    To protect product integrity and ensure environmental and worker safety, engineers became involved in the lubricant selection process. Design Engineers, Lubricant Engineers and Ergonomic Engineers all take part in choosing the proper lubricant for each assembly process.
    Design Engineers are concerned with design tolerance, part breakage, production rates, dry time and material compatibility.
    Lubricant Engineers are more focused on performance, cost, regulatory compliance and toxicity approval.
    Ergonomic Engineers remain focused on worker safety and consider factors such as friction and effort reduction, production rates, quality and consistency, and health and safety hazards.

    Lubricants Are a Part of the Design Process
    As a result of these concerns, lubricants are now included in the initial design phase of many engineered parts. In addition to detailing all facets of the part, material specifications now include the accompanying assembly lubricant and its proper assembly technique. Design stages include a battery of lubricant trials and choices are made based on performance, cost and safety. More and more frequently, water-based lubricants are the product of choice.

    The Power of Water-Based Lubricants
    A well-formulated oil-in-water emulsion overpowers the low surface energy of rubber. This means the emulsion completely coats the surface without beading up. The oil portion has a natural affinity to the rubber surface and the water is exposed to the environment, facilitating evaporation. Only a thin layer of oil contacts the rubber, an ample volume for successful assembly. The thin coating ensures no residue, temporary lubrication, no compatibility issues and a safe working environment. Once assembled, the water evaporates and the lubrication ceases.

    Water-based lubricants can be formulated with different properties making them ideal for essentially any assembly application. Lubricant properties such as viscosity, dry time, biodegradability, compatibility, and surface residue (such as adhesiveness) are all taken into consideration. Engineers can now choose a lubricant tailored exactly to their needs before production begins, eliminating many of the problems that used to occur after assembly.

    The lubricant selection process has evolved so that it is now a true collaboration between Design, Lubricant and Ergonomic Engineers. Learn more here about this multi-disciplinary engineering approach to selecting assembly lubricants.

Detergent Selection Guide

= Used ; = Preferred
SOILS Micro-90® Micro® Green Clean Micro® A07 Surface-Cleanse/930® LF2100® Zymit® Low-Foam Zymit® Pro
Adhesives
Biofilm
Biological soils: Blood, Feces, Mucous, Sebum, Sweat, Urine
Dyes, Inks
Eggs, Butter, Fruit Stains
Emulsifiers
Fat
Fingerprints
Flavor, Fragrances
Gelatin
Gels
Grass
Insoluble Salts
Milkstone
Oils
Oxides
Paraffins
Petrolatum
Proteins
Scale
Shop Dusts, Soldering Flux
Silicons
Starch
Tar
Tissue
Titanium Dioxides