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Tag Archive: Surface Cleanse/930

  1. What Is The Shelf Life Of My Cleaner? (And, Why It Matters)

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    Remember that bottle of cleaner that’s been in your cabinet for years? How do you know if it’s still effective and safe to use? These things are good forever, right?

    Absolutely not! Chemical products do indeed have a shelf life. Paying attention to expiration dates helps ensure you are using products at their peak performance levels for optimal results.

    What Is Shelf Life?

    The shelf life of a product is defined as the “length of time that a commodity may be stored without becoming unfit for use, consumption, or sale.” (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelf_life). It’s important to note that manufacturers determine the shelf life of a product based upon expectations of normal use and storage. Failure to follow recommended guidelines can limit the expected shelf life of any product.

    How Is Shelf Life Determined?

    While each product and each manufacturer is unique, shelf life is generally determined by assessing product stability under normal conditions over an extended period of time. Are the active ingredients still effective or have they deteriorated? Chemical composition and anticipated environmental factors both have a role in determining a product’s shelf life.

    Product quality can be assessed by determining the concentration of key ingredients. Once the active ingredients of a product begin to degrade, product strength may be diminished.

    Environmental factors include temperature, moisture and exposure to air. External contaminants or stresses can also affect product quality.

    What Is The Shelf Life of My Cleaner?

    Use this reference guide to see the shelf life of IPC’s cleaners:

    Is This Information On the Product Container?

    All of IPC’s products are stamped with a six-digit lot number that signifies the date of manufacture (YY/MM/DD). For example, a lot number of 190301 signifies that the product was manufactured on March 1, 2019.  The product expiration date is stamped directly below the lot number.

    How Does IPC Calculate Shelf Life?

    The shelf life of IPC’s products is determined by observation and testing. Part of the manufacturing process includes retaining a sample of each lot number produced for quality control.

    To determine the shelf life of its cleaners, IPC tests for changes in pH, specific gravity and detergency.

    What Other Factors Affect Shelf Life?

    The manner in which products are handled by the end user may also influence shelf life. It’s always a good idea to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for use, storage and handling. Follow these steps to maintain product quality and get the most out of your cleaner:

    • Store at recommended temperatures
    • Properly close containers between use – do not leave bottles uncapped
    • Do not mix with other chemicals
    • Use clean tools to avoid introducing contaminants
    • Follow manufacturer’s instructions for use

    What Happens If I Use My Cleaner After The Expiration Date?

    Using products beyond their expected expiration date is not recommended. The detergency of your cleaner may have diminished, which can have an impact on your cleaning application. If you have questions about whether or not it’s okay to use your product, contact the manufacturer for assistance.

    Have questions about cleaners? Want a free sample for testing? IPC can help!

  2. 5 Ways to Keep Your Lab Equipment In Tip-Top Shape for 2018

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    It’s January, the start of a new year and a time when people traditionally promise to make positive changes. Maybe it’s a commitment to exercising or healthy eating, a vow to save money, or maybe even a pledge to stop smoking. Whatever your resolution might be, most of us are in agreement that this is an excellent time of year to start fresh and engage in new behaviors.

    So why not also set a New Year’s resolution for your professional life. The flip of the calendar is an excellent time to establish a regular maintenance plan for your laboratory equipment.

    Just like a car, laboratory equipment must be properly maintained and kept in good working order. Car ownership comes with responsibilities like changing the oil, topping off fluids, rotating tires and washing the vehicle. Performing these actions regularly helps keep your automobile running smoothly, avoiding breakdowns. While no one likes the inconvenience of taking their car in for service, it’s much better than having to call and wait for emergency roadside assistance.

    Likewise, proper maintenance of lab apparatus helps to ensure that your equipment is working correctly and your lab is functioning efficiently. Analyzers, centrifuges and microscopes have to provide accurate readings, and pipettes, beakers, slides and flasks need to be kept clean. Failure to properly maintain lab equipment can have a direct impact on test results.

    5 Steps for Maintaining Lab Equipment:

    1. Inspection
    Inspect equipment on a regular basis. Examining equipment regularly helps discover any irregularities and ensures repairs are made on a timely basis, preventing damages from getting worse. Malfunctioning lab equipment should be repaired at once.
    2. Repair/Refurbish
    Refurbished equipment is completely disassembled and thoroughly cleaned. Some parts are polished and some may need lubrication. Faulty parts can be replaced. The reassembled apparatus frequently works just as well as a brand new piece of equipment.
    3. Calibration
    Keeping your equipment properly calibrated helps increase its accuracy to ensure that data is not corrupted. Inaccurate calibration can result in skewed data.
    4. Clean, Clean, Clean
    Regular cleaning is one of the easiest ways to keep your equipment functioning properly. Apparatus that is not thoroughly cleaned can yield inconsistent results. The exterior surfaces of all equipment should be wiped down on a daily basis, after each use. A complete cleaning should be performed at least once a week. Be sure to take these factors into consideration:

    • Set up a proper cleaning protocol
    • Use the right detergent for each job (this will depend upon the soil and the type of equipment)
    • Rinse thoroughly after cleaning
    • Avoid cross contamination
    • Clean equipment thoroughly prior to disinfecting
    Validate your cleaning process if required

    5. Maintain Safety Standards
    A well-organized lab will run more efficiently. Supplies and chemicals should be clearly labeled and stored. Safety equipment, such as fire extinguishers, showers, first aid kits, and eye wash should be present and well maintained. Lab personnel should be sure to wear protective gear such as gloves, goggles, lab coats and masks. Chemicals should be disposed of properly as instructed on the SDS.

    Properly maintained lab equipment is essential for accuracy and consistency of test results. Investing the time and money to set up and follow a regular maintenance plan will provide long-term savings by keeping your laboratory functioning smoothly and efficiently. This is one New Year’s resolution you’ll certainly want to keep!

    International Products Corporation (IPC) manufactures a full line of specialty cleaners that are excellent for cleaning laboratory equipment. Contact IPC to learn more.

     

Detergent Selection Guide

= Used ; = Preferred
SOILS Micro-90® Micro® Green Clean Micro® A07 Surface-Cleanse/930® LF2100® Zymit® Low-Foam Zymit® Pro
Adhesives
Biofilm
Biological soils: Blood, Feces, Mucous, Sebum, Sweat, Urine
Dyes, Inks
Eggs, Butter, Fruit Stains
Emulsifiers
Fat
Fingerprints
Flavor, Fragrances
Gelatin
Gels
Grass
Insoluble Salts
Milkstone
Oils
Oxides
Paraffins
Petrolatum
Proteins
Scale
Shop Dusts, Soldering Flux
Silicons
Starch
Tar
Tissue
Titanium Dioxides